Reminder: Today’s 6:30PM meeting at Stonewall!

Sermon-remember

Room Change: We’re meeting in the building to the left of the usual entrance to the Crystal Clear meeting area. There will be a sign on the door.

Today at 6:30PM: Get FREE CANDY at today’s CMA meeting at 1160 North High Street , Columbus, OH 43215. See you there!

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Keep coming back | Just for Today, April 15

We have come to enjoy living clean and want more of the good things that the NA Fellowship holds for us.

Basic Text, p. 27

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Can you remember a time when you looked at the addicts recovering in NA and wondered, “If they aren’t using drugs, what on earth do they have to laugh about?” Did you believe that the fun stopped when the using stopped? So many of us did; we were certain that we were leaving the “good life” behind. Today, many of us can laugh at that misconception because we know how full our life in recovery can be.

Many of the things we enjoy so much in recovery are gained by actively participating in the Fellowship of NA. We begin to find true companionship, friends who understand and care about us just for ourselves. We find a place where we can be useful to others. There are recovery meetings, service activities, and fellowship gatherings to fill our time and occupy our interests. The fellowship can be a mirror to reflect back to us a more accurate image of who we are. We find teachers, helpers, friends, love, care, and support. The fellowship always has more to offer us, as long as we keep coming back.

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Just for today: I know where the “good life” is. I’ll keep coming back.

Copyright © 1991-2016 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

A new vision | Just for Today, April 14

Do we really want to be rid of our resentments, our anger, our fear?

Basic Text, p. 34

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Why do we call them “shortcomings”? Perhaps they should be called “long-goings,” because that’s often what it takes for them to fade from our lives. Some of us feel that our shortcomings are the very characteristics that saved our lives when we used. If this is true, then it is little wonder that we sometimes cling to them like old, dear friends.

If we are having trouble with resentment, anger, or fear, we may want to envision what our lives could be like without these troubling defects. Asking ourselves why we react in a certain manner can sometimes root out the fear at the core of our conduct. “Why am I afraid to step beyond these aspects of my personality?” we ask ourselves. “Am I afraid of who I will be without these attributes?”

Once we have uncovered our fear, we are able to move beyond it. We try to imagine what our lives could be like without some of our more glaring shortcomings. This gives us a feeling for what lies past our fear, providing the motivation we need to push through it. Our Higher Power offers us a new vision for our lives, free of our defects. That vision is the essence of our own best, brightest dreams for ourselves. We need not fear that vision.

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Just for today: I will imagine what my life would be like without my character defects. I will ask for the willingness to have God remove my shortcomings.

Copyright © 1991-2016 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

People-pleasing | Just for Today, April 13

…approval-seeking behavior carried us further into our addiction….

Basic Text, p. 14

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When others approve of what we do or say, we feel good; when they disapprove, we feel bad. Their opinions of us, and how those opinions make us feel, can have positive value. By making us feel good about steering a straight course, they encourage us to continue doing so. “People-pleasing” is something else entirely. We “people-please” when we do things, right or wrong, solely to gain another person’s approval.

Low self-esteem can make us think we need someone else’s approval to feel okay about ourselves. We do whatever we think it will take to make them tell us we’re okay. We feel good for awhile. Then we start hurting. In trying to please another person, we’ve diminished ourselves and our values. We realize that the approval of others will not fill the emptiness inside us.

The inner satisfaction we seek can be found in doing the right things for the right reasons. We break the people-pleasing cycle when we stop acting merely to gain others’ approval and start acting on our Higher Power’s will for us. When we do, we may be pleasantly surprised to find that the people who really count in our lives will approve all the more of our behavior. Most importantly, though, we will approve of ourselves.

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Just for today: Higher Power, help me live in accordance with spiritual principles. Only then can I approve of myself.

Copyright © 1991-2016 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

“How Do I Deal with My Drug Addict Husband?”

On Quora yesterday, this question was presented: “How do I deal with my drug addict husband?” Many people had already responded with a variety of answers ranging from rehab to divorce. I want to start by saying that in my opinion, none of these answers are wrong. Just different ways people think they would deal […]

via “How Do I Deal With My Drug Addict Husband?” — oficeandmenblog

The big picture | Just for Today, April 12

All spiritual awakenings have some things in common. Common elements include an end to loneliness and a sense of direction in our lives.

Basic Text, p. 50

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Some kinds of spiritual experiences take place when we confront something larger than we are. We suspect that forces beyond our understanding are operating. We see a fleeting glimpse of the big picture and find humility in that moment.

Our journey through the Twelve Steps will bring about a spiritual experience of the same nature, only more profound and lasting. We undergo a continual process of ego-deflation, while at the same time we become more conscious of the larger perspective. Our view of the world expands to the point where we no longer possess an exaggerated sense of our own importance.

Through our new awareness, we no longer feel isolated from the rest of the human race. We may not understand why the world is the way it is or why people sometimes treat one another so savagely. But we do understand suffering and, in recovery, we can do our best to alleviate it. When our individual contribution is combined with others, we become an essential part of a grand design. We are connected at last.

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Just for today: I am but one person in the entire scheme of things. I humbly accept my place in the big picture.

Copyright © 1991-2016 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

A closed mind | Just for Today, April 11

A new idea cannot be grafted onto a closed mind…. Open-mindedness leads us to the very insights that have eluded us during our lives.

Basic Text, p. 96

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We arrived in NA at the lowest point in our lives. We’d just about run out of ideas. What we needed most when we got here were new ideas, new ways of living, shared from the experience of people who’d seen those ideas work. Yet our closed minds prevented us from taking in the very ideas we needed to live.

Denial keeps us from appreciating just how badly we really need new ideas and new direction. By admitting our powerlessness and recognizing how truly unmanageable our lives have become, we allow ourselves to see how much we need what NA has to offer.

Self-dependence and self-will can keep us from admitting even the possibility of the existence a Power greater than ourselves. However, when we admit the sorry state self-will has gotten us into, we open our eyes and our minds to new possibilities. When others tell us of a Power that has brought sanity to their lives, we begin to believe that such a Power may do the same for us.

A tree stripped of its branches will die unless new branches can be grafted onto its trunk. In the same way, addiction stripped us of whatever direction we had. To grow or even to survive, we must open our minds and allow new ideas to be grafted onto our lives.

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Just for today: I will ask my Higher Power to open my mind to the new ideas of recovery.

Copyright © 1991-2016 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Too busy | Just for Today, April 10

We must use what we learn or we will lose it, no matter how long we have been clean.

Basic Text, p. 85

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After putting some clean time together, some of us have a tendency to forget what our most important priority is. Once a week or less we say, “I’ve gotta get to a meeting tonight. It’s been…” We’ve been caught up in other things, important for sure, but no more so than our continued participation in Narcotics Anonymous.

It happens gradually. We get jobs. We reunite with our families. We’re raising children, the dog is sick, or we’re going to school at night. The house needs to be cleaned. The lawn needs to be mowed. We have to work late. We’re tired. There’s a good show at the theater tonight. And all of a sudden, we notice that we haven’t called our sponsor, been to a meeting, spoken to a newcomer, or even talked to God in quite a while.

What do we do at this point? Well, we either renew our commitment to our recovery, or we continue being too busy to recover until something happens and our lives become unmanageable. Quite a choice! Our best bet is to put more of our energy into maintaining the foundation of recovery on which our lives are built. That foundation makes everything else possible, and it will surely crumble if we get too busy with everything else.

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Just for today: I can’t afford to be too busy to recover. I will do something today that sustains my recovery.

Copyright © 1991-2016 by Narcotics Anonymous World S

Acting out | Just for Today, April 9

We learn to experience feelings and realize they can do us no harm unless we act on them.

IP No. 16, For the Newcomer

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Many of us came to Narcotics Anonymous with something less than an overwhelming desire to stop using. Sure, the drugs were causing us problems, and we wanted to be rid of the problems, but we didn’t want to stop getting high. Eventually, though, we saw that we couldn’t have one without the other. Even though we really wanted to get loaded, we didn’t use; we weren’t willing to pay the price anymore. The longer we stayed clean and worked the program, the more freedom we experienced. Sooner or later, the compulsion to use was lifted from us completely, and we stayed clean because we wanted to live clean.

The same principles apply to other negative impulses that may plague us. We may feel like doing something destructive, just because we want to. We’ve done it before, and sometimes we think we’ve gotten away with it, but sometimes we haven’t. If we’re not willing to pay the price for acting on such feelings, we don’t have to act on them.

It may be hard, maybe even as hard as it was to stay clean in the beginning. But others have felt the same way and have found the freedom not to act on their negative impulses. By sharing about it and seeking the help of other recovering people and a Power greater than ourselves, we can find the direction, the support, and the strength we need to abstain from any destructive compulsion.

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Just for today: It’s okay to feel my feelings. With the help of my sponsor, my NA friends, and my Higher Power, I am free not to act out my negative feelings.

Copyright © 1991-2016 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved